Counseling Center

Derham steps and Chapel belltower on the St. Paul, MN campus

Welcome to the St. Catherine University Counseling Center. While our services are being offered virtually at this time, the Counseling Center remains open and committed to providing support to our St. Kate’s community. We will be open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 9 a.m.–4 p.m., June 2–August 12. Students are eligible to use counseling services if they are registered and enrolled in summer classes. Our Let's Talk consultation service and ProtoCall (our 24/7/365 telephone crisis line) will continue to be available to all students throughout the summer (no need to be registered for summer classes). See below for more information and email us with any questions at counselingcenter@stkate.edu.

If you are experiencing a mental health crisis, please see the Crisis Counseling section, below, for after-hours and crisis counseling resources.

About the Counseling Center

Our caring staff offers a variety of services to support student mental health, at no cost to students. We provide confidential services including short-term individual counseling for students, Let’s Talk consultations, a Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday 2 p.m. crisis hour, phone crisis counseling through a collaboration with ProtoCall, referrals to campus and community resources, and consultation to students, faculty, and staff.

We provide quality counseling services to students coping with emotional, social, behavioral, and identity-related difficulties common to the college population. Each therapist has expertise in mental and emotional health and views students’ concerns in the context of human development and cultural identity. Our counseling staff brings a professional and personal commitment to providing services within a multicultural framework. Please refer to our bios on Student Success to learn more about our team.

You are welcome here. We are deeply committed to creating a welcoming, emotionally safe space in which you can be seen and valued in your entirety, including your intersecting identities and unique cultural background. Our counseling center strives to be a system that is attuned and responsive to how students may be affected by both current social-political circumstances and historical marginalization. As mental health professionals, we recognize the impact of bias, discrimination, oppression, and historical trauma on psychological, emotional, and physical distress. We also acknowledge that this pain is often silenced and unaddressed, and we strive to be space in which your voice can be heard and valued. We want to support you in whatever you are facing and invite you to connect with us.

Current Services for Students

While all of our services are being offered virtually at this time, the Counseling Center remains open and committed to providing support to our St. Kate’s community. Counseling sessions are offered to currently enrolled students by secure video platform or phone.

Our remote counseling sessions focus on stress management and well-being. Sessions typically last 30 to 45 minutes. The first session typically focuses on gathering basic background and information about your current experience and needs. Any ongoing sessions aim to increase functioning levels, emotional wellness, and resilience through emotional support and skills for well-being. If more intensive counseling support or treatment is needed, or if circumstances or location* require alternative options, your counselor may support you in identifying additional resources and referrals in your community. Please scroll down for more information regarding referrals in the Referral Support section.

** Please note that we may be unable to provide ongoing counseling services to students located out of state due to licensing guidelines for psychologists in Minnesota. These guidelines vary by state during the COVID-19 pandemic. We welcome you to contact us at counselingcenter@stkate.edu with any questions about this or if you need help identifying resources and referrals in your area.

** Please note that our center does not provide assessment or documentation for ADHD or emotional support animals. Feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss referral ideas for off-campus resources.

Are Counseling Center services offered during the summer?

Yes, the Counseling Center is open on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. throughout the summer to support St. Kate’s students. You are eligible to use counseling services (sessions will continue to be held remotely) if you are registered and enrolled in summer classes at St. Kate's. Let's Talk and ProtoCall (our 24/7/365 telephone crisis line) will continue to be available on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays to all students throughout the summer (no need to be registered for summer classes). If you have questions regarding services, please email us at counselingcenter@stkate.edu.

How do I make an appointment?

To request a counseling appointment, please complete and submit our Summer 2021 Appointment Request Form. Please remember that we are not fully staffed over the summer and administrative tasks are conducted on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. We will get back to you by email as soon we can with appointment options that match the availability you provide on the form. If you are in crisis and need to be seen quickly, please see the Crisis Counseling tab for faster options. Feel free to email us with any questions about scheduling at counselingcenter@stkate.edu.

What if I need to cancel?

If you are unable to keep an appointment, please send an email to counselingcenter@stkate.edu to let us know as soon as possible, preferably at least 24 hours in advance. This allows us to use the appointment time for another student who is waiting to see a counselor.

How many sessions are available to me?

The Counseling Center operates within a short-term framework in order to meet the needs of many students. On average, students use 5 sessions per academic year. Appointments are typically scheduled weekly or bi-weekly; decisions about frequency and length of counseling are discussed with your counselor. If you need long-term counseling (more than 8 sessions per academic semester, or more than 4 sessions over the summer), we can help identify therapists in the community who can provide this. We also offer referral assistance to specialized counseling programs, such as eating disorder or chemical dependency treatment. (Scroll down for more information regarding referral support.)

Who will know?

Counseling center staff maintain professional standards as defined by state law, including regarding confidentiality and safety. This means that we will not share information from your counseling sessions with other people unless we have your written permission or need to ensure your safety or someone else's safety. You will receive our written privacy and confidentiality policy when you make your first appointment, and your counselor will be happy to discuss any questions or concerns you might have.

View the Client Bill of Rights

If you are experiencing a life-threatening emergency, please contact one of the following mental health crisis resources:

Or contact a mental health emergency resource such as:

  • Ramsey County Urgent Care for Adult Mental Health (651-266-7900)
  • The National Crisis Text Line (text HOME to 741741)

Crisis Counseling Hour

The Counseling Center offers a Crisis Counseling Hour with virtual sessions provided by counseling center staff from 2–3 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. Appointments typically run 20–25 minutes and are arranged on a first-come, first-served basis.
To request a Crisis Hour counseling session, reach out to us in one of the following ways before 1:45 p.m. on the day you wish to have your session:

You will be contacted by email between 1:45 and 2 p.m. with further information regarding a specific appointment time and instructions for accessing the virtual session. (Your patience and understanding regarding timing is greatly appreciated as the volume of requests with this type of system is difficult to predict.)

Please note that we might not be able to provide counseling services to students located outside the state due to licensing guidelines for psychologists in Minnesota. However, we would be glad to provide a brief consultation during the Crisis Hour time to offer brief support and to assist you in identifying counseling/crisis support in your area, if that would be helpful. Also know that you are always welcome to call our partnered Crisis Line at any time, 24/7/365, by dialing 651-690-6805 (press 1 at the prompt).

After-Hours Crisis Counseling

If this isn’t a life-threatening emergency, but you feel an urgent need to talk with a crisis counselor, the St. Kate's Crisis Counseling line (in partnership with ProtoCall) can be reached by dialing 651-690-6805 and pressing 1 at the prompt (evenings, weekends, holidays, or anytime the counseling center can’t be reached).

Let's Talk is meant to provide easy access to informal, confidential consultation for all St. Kate’s students. Students are able to meet with a counselor from the St. Kate's Counseling Center for 15-minute conversations. The counselor will listen to your concerns and provide support, perspective, and suggestions for resources.

When and where?

  • Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays between 1 and 2 p.m.
  • First-come, first served — no appointment required
  • Virtual through Zoom!

Is Let’s Talk the same as counseling?

Let's Talk is a drop-in resource for brief, informal consultation with a counselor. Let's Talk is not a replacement for ongoing counseling or for students in crisis. (If you are in crisis and need urgent assistance, Let's Talk is not the best option to meet your needs. Instead, please scroll up for more information on crisis counseling options.)

When is Let’s Talk a good fit?

Let’s Talk may be a good fit for topics like these: You have a question about counseling and what it’s like to be in counseling; you'd like to briefly explore options for addressing a challenge; you want ideas about how to support a friend, or you'd like to briefly get the perspective of a counselor on topics such as academic stress, feeling anxious, relationships, adjustment to new culture, family problems, feeling down, financial worries, reactions to sociopolitical events, other concerns.

The Let‘s Talk program at St. Kate’s is based in part on the Let’s Talk program at Cornell University.  With permission, some of the material describing this program has been duplicated from Cornell University’s Let’s Talk program.

This service is on pause over the summer and will resume after the first week of classes in September. Feel free to contact us by email for questions regarding this service.

The drop-in hours are meant to provide easy access to informal, confidential consultation for students specifically hoping to connect with a BIPOC-identified counselor. Students are able to meet with Rebecca from the St. Kate's Counseling Center for 15-20 minute conversations. The counselor will listen to your concerns and provide support, perspective, and suggestions for resources.

When and where?

  • Fridays between 1 and 3 p.m.
  • First-come, first served — no appointment required
  • Virtual through Zoom!

Are the drop-in hours the same as counseling?

No, this drop-in time is more of a consultation than counseling. It is for students who would like to briefly connect with a BIPOC-identified counselor — whether to receive some initial support in coping with experiences of racialized harassment, discrimination, or trauma — or to connect and learn about counseling services, or to ask about any other concerns. (If you are in crisis and need urgent assistance, the drop-in hours are not the best option to meet your needs. Instead, please scroll up for more information on crisis counseling options.)

If the drop-in time does not work for you, yet it feels important to you to specifically meet with a BIPOC-identified counselor, please let our front desk staff know and we will do our best to find a time that works.

This service is on pause over the summer and will resume after the first week of classes in September. Feel free to contact us by email for questions regarding this service.

  • A space for building each other up and celebrating all of who we are
  • All St. Kate’s BIPOC students welcome
  • BIPOC facilitators from the Counseling Center and MIPS
  • Thursdays at 4 pm, April 22—May 6
  • Virtual through Zoom!
  • Sign up for email reminders here
  • For additional information or with questions, contact Rebecca at rrroepke@stkate.edu or (651) 690-6539

Having a community of support has always been key to college success, and is even more vital in the midst of an isolating pandemic, racial reckoning, xenophobia, and violence. In this group, we recognize the unique experiences of BIPOC students at a Predominantly White Institution in a world that can feel out of control and unsafe. We want to provide a space to reflect on and give voice to these experiences, build meaningful and validating community connections, and deepen an internal sense of safety and power. This is a place to rest, re-energize, and grow in our identities and community/self-care skills. This group will be a decolonized space of shared power between students and facilitators, of liberating conversations, and (ultimately) of a more sustainable sense of empowerment, hope, and joy.

Topics are flexible and based on student interest. Examples include: cultural healing practices and perspectives on wellness • racial battle fatigue • grief and mourning • historical/collective trauma and ancestral wisdom/strengths • imposter syndrome • accepting all parts of self / identities • navigating privileged & oppressed identities and microaggressions • relationships, feelings of isolation, and balancing school with life • academic stress, better sleep, coping skills, asking for help, saying no • maintaining self/community care in the current socio-political climate • and the topics that matter to YOU!

This space will be held by BIPOC staff of the Counseling Center and Multicultural and International Programs and Services (MIPS) office. This is not a therapy group, and as such, you do not need to have a mental health condition to attend, and attending the circle will not automatically connect you with the Counseling Center.

(Note: Please see the Remote Counseling Sessions and Crisis Counseling on this web page if you are looking specifically for mental health services.)

At times, a student’s counseling needs or interests may be best served by referrals to off-campus resources, such as a therapist with a particular specialization or treatment within a longer-term model than our center can offer. At times, students seek to connect with a counselor with a specific shared aspect of identity or lived experience that may or may not be currently represented among the St. Kate’s Counseling Center’s small counseling staff. Each of our counselors would welcome talking directly with you about any questions or concerns and can offer assistance in referrals to mental health resources in the community that might best fit your needs and interests. This might include private practitioners, intensive outpatient programs, or specialty treatment centers. You are welcome to ask for a referral-focused appointment at the Counseling Center.

Please note that the St. Catherine University Counseling Center is not affiliated with local providers and cannot guarantee their services. Referral options offered by the Counseling Center are meant to be a starting place for you to decide who is the best fit for you based on your specific needs, circumstances, and preferences. We encourage you to also look through APA's tips for choosing a therapist to help you determine whether any given therapist might be a good fit for you.

For information and resources to support your efforts to get connected to a provider off-campus, please read Getting Connected to an Off-Campus Therapist: Referral Support, Information, and Resources.

Please note: Our center does not provide assessment or documentation for ADHD or emotional support animals. Feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss referral ideas for off-campus resources.

Recent events continue to illuminate the long and entrenched history of structural and systemic injustice in this country and in our communities. Overt prejudice, individual and systemic racism, ableism, religious stigma and Islamophobia, and discrimination against LGBTQ+ individuals and communities have been propagated by this social-political climate. The current pandemic has increased anti-Asian racism and has disproportionately impacted the Black community and many communities of color.

As mental health professionals, we recognize the impact of discrimination, oppression, and historical trauma on psychological, emotional, and physical distress. We condemn all forms of oppression. As the majority of our staff members identify as white, we are deepening our commitment to more effectively support those who have experienced individual discrimination and structural acts of aggression and racism. This includes examining ourselves and our work to ensure we are doing what we can to act and provide services within an anti-racist framework. As part of our commitment, we are also strengthening intentional collaboration with campus and community partners. Please consider us a resource and support, whether you are facing anger, grief, exhaustion, or other reactions to these patterns of violence and systemic injustice, or working to better understand your privilege and move toward anti-racism and allyship.

At times, students seek to connect with a counselor with a specific shared aspect of identity or lived experience that may or may not be currently represented among our small counseling staff. Each of our counselors would welcome talking directly with you about any questions or concerns about lived experience, shared identity, or areas of expertise. Whenever a student prefers, know that our counselors can also offer assistance in referrals to BIPOC-identified therapists, LGBTQ+-identified therapists, or mental health resources in the community that might best fit your needs and interests.
The following webpage lists several of the offices and organizations that together support inclusive excellence at St. Kate’s.

Resources

The following resources offer some good ideas of key ways to support mental health and general well-being in this complex time. These offer an important starting point for reflection and self-care strategies. Please be sure to check out our stress and well-being resources section as well for additional tips on supporting well-being.

The COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful and unsettling for everyone. While reactions can vary and people are affected in different ways, everyone is feeling the impact in some way. We recognize this pandemic has increased anti-Asian racism and xenophobia and has disproportionately impacted the Black community and many communities of color.

Whatever your emotions are — afraid, sad, hopeful, angry — your feelings are valid. When we tune in to our experience and emotions, we can then better recognize what we may need in any given moment and take steps to care for ourselves during these challenging times. We would be glad to talk with you about your thoughts and reactions to this time, and invite you to make a counseling appointment.

The following brief articles from our counseling staff highlight some strategies for well-being during the pandemic. Read more articles on health and well-being on CampusWell.

The following resources, for both students and parents, offer some good ideas of key ways to support mental health and general well-being at this time. These offer an important starting point for reflection and self-care strategies.

Our staff have collected some of our favorite resources for stress management and general well-being. These include apps, articles, YouTube videos, websites, podcasts, and other resources to help support your well-being. Please take a look and we hope you will find something that will help to manage stress and take care of yourself. Also, please note we have a list of additional resources in our culturally-responsive resources drop-down above. Check it out for more ideas on cultivating well-being.

CampusWell Articles: Brief articles written by Counseling Center staff on various topics related to well-being and resilience
Reclaiming Routines
Stop Trying to Do All the Things
Take One Step
Nurturing Resilience
Nurturing Resilience Through Connection
Nurturing Resilience Through Self-Compassion
The Body as a Resource for Resilience

How to make stress your friend
TED Talk

Videos on Performance Anxiety by Dr. Sian Bielock
Brain Teasers: Cracking the Mind’s Toughest Riddles
Perform Your Best Under Stress

Informational worksheet on stress management plus handouts and tips for strategies

Coping with Difficult Emotions: TIPP Skills

Ten Percent
Website for meditation

Mindful Self-Compassion
Meditations and other resources to engage in self-compassion

Progressive Muscle Relaxation
Guided audio
Website with additional suggestions  

Brown Girl Therapy - “Brown Girl Therapy is a safe space for all women -- especially South Asian women, and WOC -- to discuss taboo topics as they pertain to our mental health and wellness in this world and in our relationships.” Facebook group, trainings, and other resources available at:  Instagram or Facebook or Linktree

Apps

  • Mindfulness and Meditation: Headspace, Calm, MyLife Meditation, Insight Timer, Liberate (by and for BIPOC community)
  • Stress Management: MindShift
  • Sleep and Insomnia: CBTi-Coach   

YouTube Videos

7-Minute Mindful Breathing Exercise

3-Minute Mindful Breathing Exercise

Leaves on a Stream, Separating from Thoughts and Overthinking

Self-Love and Compassion

Body Scan and Progressive Muscle Relaxation

Podcasts and Related Resources

1 in 5
For Student-Parents, podcast and additional resources

Unconditionally Worthy
Podcast, Tedx Talk, and e-book on topic of self-worth by Dr. Adia Gooden

Therapy for Black Girls podcast
“Weekly chat about all things mental health, personal development, and all the small decisions we can make to become the best possible versions of ourselves.” Podcast, additional resources, and therapist directory.

Between Sessions podcast
“Two brown chicks changing the face of therapy on both sides of the couch.” Podcast and additional resources.

The Mindful Muslim podcast
“The Mindful Muslim Podcast is a podcast where members from Inspirited Minds have conversations with guests with personal experiences of mental health struggles as well as professionals working within the field.” Podcast and additional resources available.

Latinx Therapy podcast
“Tune in with Adriana Alejandre, LMFT to the weekly podcast that discusses mental health topics related to Latinas, Latinos and Latinx individuals in efforts to demystify myths and diagnoses.” Podcast and additional resources available.

Stories of Stigma: South Asian Mental Health Podcast from MannMukti
“Each episode features a different guest who can speak to us about a unique topic in South Asian mental health, but the constant theme throughout each podcast is a conversation about stigma.” Podcast and additional resources.

Eating Disorders are among the most life-threatening mental health issues (ranking near substance use disorders) and come in a variety of forms, including:

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/warning-signs-and-symptoms

Helping a Friend or Loved One

Body Image, Eating Disorders, and Disordered Eating

Recovery Warriors podcast, blog, and app. The Recovery Warriors app helps you track meals, emotions, thoughts, and behaviors for your own use or to share with your therapist/dietician.  Access stress tips, skills, articles and podcasts on body image and eating topics, and even search for a therapist.

Recovery Record app helps you track meals and snacks and share with your therapist/dietician, and offers the option of uploading photos of your meals and having alarms to remind you to log your food.  It also allows you to track thoughts, feelings, behaviors, food exposure, and view progress charts.  Create and monitor weekly goals; access meal planner, coping skills, reasons to recover, and affirmations; manage triggers; join a community of support; or pair up with another user.

Peace Meal “A podcast produced by The Emily Program.  Peace Meal covers topics related to eating disorders, body image, and how society may influence our thinking. Join host Dr. Jillian Lampert as she sits down with experts in the field and those experiencing recovery for themselves.”

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/  “The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) is the largest nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting individuals and families affected by eating disorders.”  Includes a 24/7 helpline available by phone, text, or chat: https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/help-support/contact-helpline

https://haescommunity.com/ “Health at Every Size® principles help us advance social justice, create an inclusive and respectful community, and support people of all sizes in finding compassionate ways to take care of themselves.”

https://bodygossip.org/ “Body Gossip is a charity that combines Arts and Education to empower every body to be the best version of themselves and rock their own brand of gorgeous.”

https://www.eatingdisorderhope.com/  Offers a variety of education materials, resource lists and tools, a newsletter for family and friends of people struggling with eating disorders, and more.  Two articles of particular relevance to college students are:

@covid19eatingsupport  on Instagram: This account was only active from March 2020-March 2021, but is a source for a variety of anti-oppressive eating disorder resources, including directories; links to therapists, dieticians, and coaches who continue to offer weekly meal/snack support on their own accounts; and recordings of previous live meal/snack support sessions. 

Intuitive Eating

Hunger and Fullness scales can be helpful in getting back in touch with hunger and satiety cues and practicing intuitive eating.  One example and an explanation on how to use it is available here: https://alissarumsey.com/nutrition/hunger-fullness-scale/  This dietician also offers a mindful eating exercise guide.

Intuitive Eating is a self-care eating framework, which integrates instinct, emotion, and rational thought and was created by two dietitians, Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch in 1995. Intuitive Eating is a weight-inclusive, evidence-based model with a validated assessment scale and over 100 studies to date.  The Web site includes basic information, blog, resources, articles, and an Intuitive Eating Community forum.

How to Eat Intuitively article on Campus Well

Body Image and Gender Identity

Trans Folx Fighting EDs Includes resources, support groups, trainings, and more.  Also on Facebook: www.facebook.com/transfolxfightingeds

Body image, sexual orientation and gender identity report from Mental Health Foundation (UK)

Gender Dysphoria and Eating Disorders  basic information

http://queerfeminism.com/2012/05/15/the-deviant-body-a-queertrans-perspective-on-eating-disorders/  written by a trans author in recovery

#EatingDisordersAreForWhiteWomen Blog entry by Janani Balasubramanian about lack of representation in eating disorder education/information (touches on race and gender)

Gender Non-Conforming Perspective: Body Image and Identity  Interview with Alok, a nonbinary South Asian person about body image by The Emily Program

Body Image and Race/Colonization

https://www.nalgonapositivitypride.com/ “Nalgona Positivity Pride (NPP) is an in-community eating disorders and body-positive organization dedicated in creating visibility and resources for Black, Indigenous, communities of color (BICC.) Since 2016, NPP has been raising awareness around the specific needs of BICC through digital media, education, grassroots eating disorders treatment models, and art. Rooted in Xicana indigenous feminism and DIY punx praxis, NPP emerged out of a great need not only to shed light on the experiences and barriers that exist in BICC affected by body-image and troubled eating but to create opportunities of healing by and for BICC.”

“Nalgona Positivity Pride Talks Body Positivity & Disordered Eating” episode of Latinx Therapy Podcast (Jan 16, 2019).  Available via Apple, Stitcher, Player FM, etc.  Discussion includes the impact of colonization and how Europeans created food/body hierarchies to separate themselves from those they colonized.

Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia book by Sabrina Strings.  Available in print and as an audio book.

Eating Disorders in the Asian American / Pacific Islander Community
Eating Disorders in the Black Community
Eating Disorders in the Latinx Community
Eating Disorders in the Native American / Indigenous Community
Eating Disorders and Spiritual Fasting

Islam and Eating Disorders  

For Muslims With Eating Disorders

https://www.ritualwell.org/ritual/when-fasting-not-teshuvah-yom-kippur-eating-disorders (includes example of an eating ritual)

https://www.myjewishlearning.com/here-now/yom-kippur-fasting-and-disordered-eating/  (includes alternatives to fasting from food)

https://thebluedovefoundation.org/to-have-an-eating-disorder-on-yom-kippur/ (includes discussion of discerning whether to fast this year)

Eating Disorders, Athletes, and Moderating Exercise

Athletes and Eating Disorders Basic information, resources for athletes and coaches, links to specialized treatment programs, and information on including athletes’ fitness needs in treatment

Eating Disorders and Athletes - Includes a toolkit for coaches and trainers

Gold Medal Olympian Jessie Diggins opens up about her eating disorder, hoping to inspire others to get help

Exercise Compulsion and its Dangers

How to Find Balance with Exercise in Eating Disorder Recovery

Appropriate Exercise During Eating Disorder Treatment

Guidelines for the Use of Exercise in Eating Disorders Treatment

Yoga and Body Image Coalition “We promote optimal well-being and healthy body relationships through a consistent yoga practice, including physical asana, meditation, and beyond. We are committed to creating safe spaces for bodies of all types, devoid of body shaming, while offering a comprehensive body image education for yoga teachers, community and media outlets.”  Includes a podcast, Instagram account, Facebook page, and Yoga and Body Image  book.

Trauma and Relationship to Body

Eating Disorders, Trauma, and PTSD

Recovering From Trauma and Rebuilding Body Image

The Healing Trauma Podcast: Eating Disorders and Trauma With Lucia Bennett episode available on Apple Podcasts, iHeart Radio, and more.

Additional Services

We offer access to the SMH Online Screening Program, a free and confidential online screening for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Take a screening

The Counseling Center provides outreach to the campus community through presentations, workshops, and other means to share information about mental health, coping, and well-being. When schedules allow, we collaborate with you on your events to add a counseling perspective, provide psychoeducational information, share our expertise on mental health topics and/or simply be there to talk about our services and support your event. To explore the possibility of our collaboration or participation in an event, feel free to email counselingcenter@stkate.edu.

We provide consultations for faculty and staff who have questions about interacting with students who are coping with emotional and mental health issues. Specific ways we can help include providing information about specific mental health issues, identifying possible resources in the community, or suggestions regarding how to talk to the individual about seeking help from a mental health professional. Please call our main office to inquire about a phone or in-person consultation.

For students who are interested in exploring psychiatric medication options, psychiatry services are available at the St. Kate's Health and Wellness Center.

Hours

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays,  9 a.m.–4 p.m. (June 2–August 12)