Quincy Craft Faber '09

American Sign Language and Interpreting

The stellar faculty and curriculum of the ASL/interpreting department provided me the means to develop the language and interpreting skills necessary to succeed.

Residence

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Building Experience

“While a student at St. Kate’s, I networked with seasoned interpreters in the field who subsequently became my colleagues,” Quincy says. She also volunteered at Deaf community events, spending time at the Charles Thompson Memorial Hall, a social hall and meeting place in St. Paul for the Deaf. The experience helped her understand the cultural complexities of facilitating communication between Deaf and hearing people. She also made good Deaf friends.

Collaborative research with Gajewski Mickelson also helped Quincy’s transition into the profession. In October 2012, the duo presented “Developing Ethical Competencies: ‘Training’ Interpreters to be Ethically Fit” at the national convention of the Conference of Interpreter Trainers in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Today

Diploma in hand, Quincy Craft Faber left St. Catherine ready to start building a successful career as an ASL interpreter. Her first step: Earning her National Interpreter Certification, a hurdle she cleared immediately after graduation. The certification is required for all professional ASL interpreting jobs, and most St. Catherine alumnae eventually earn it.

Quincy credits St. Kate’s with her burgeoning career as a full-time interpreter in private practice. “The stellar faculty and curriculum of the ASL/interpreting department provided me the means to develop the language and interpreting skills necessary to succeed,” she says.

The program’s emphasis on community involvement also helped Quincy make personal connections in the Twin Cities Deaf community. She still turns to that network today for job recommendations and referrals for interpreting jobs.