Topics Course Schedules

Select the appropriate term below to view the special topics courses offered at that time.

Course Title Course Information Day Time Instructor Description
Building a Creative Life: Inquiry, Imagination, Action ART 3994, D02, 17673 TR 3:20-5:00pm Rudquist This course explores the two sides of living a creative life: meaning making (developing a strong sense of personal expression) and professional practice (application of communication, leadership and management skills). Using a project-based approach anchored by a social justice theme, students will engage in a community of ethical, interdisciplinary artists and thinkers responding to and shaping the world we live in. Open to students from all disciplines and majors, this course is the first of a three-part seminar required for all studio art and art history majors and minors (replaces senior seminar). Pre-requisite: any one course in ART or ARTH. 
Rhetoric of Resistance: Place, Power, and Protest COMM 4994, D01, 17635/CRST 4994, D01, 17701 MWF 2:15-3:20pm McCue-Enser

This class will use readings, audio-visual artifacts, documentaries, and local site visits to explore the relationship between place, power, and protest.  We will explore the role of historical discourses about people and place and the ways in which they work to construct a fixed notion of belongingness as well as how non-dominant voices assert alternative ways of being and belonging.  Grounded in indigenous theories of decolonialism, as well as queer and feminist, this course examines the ways in which discursive, visual, and performative texts reveal, challenge, and transform cultural norms.   Meets the CRST core requirement.

Clinical Education DPT 7661, G01, 17669 M-F 8:00am-5:00pm Anderson, Ingman This special topics course coincides with DPT 7145 Clinical Education II during semester one of year three of the DPT Program. DPT 7145 is a 12-week clinical experience. This special topics course covers an additional one week in the clinic to replace some of the time lost from the cancellation of DPT 5070 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Refer to the course description for DPT 7145 for more details.
Food is Medicine FSNU 2992, D01, 17697 Online Online Thames

This course introduces the concepts of the evidenced-based complementary, integrative and functional nutrition approach to health care that focuses on identifying the root causes and system imbalances that influence health and disease. With cooking demonstrations and case study application, the course explores food-based solutions for maintaining and improving health and preventing disease.

Journeys of Death and Dying HHS 6982, G01, 17104 R 6:00-9:00pm Geisler In this course, we examine the historical, social, cultural, political, spiritual, and ethical context of the dying process, death rituals, care of the body, the grieving process and bereavement from a holistic perspective. Using theories, research, personal experiences, reflection, critical thinking, intuition, art, writing, and collaborative learning strategies, we examine the emotions, behaviors, beliefs, attitudes, symbols, rituals, and meaning-making related to death and dying. We will explore multifaceted roles (e.g. dying person, caregivers, family members, friends, professionals) and discuss how these roles contribute to the understanding of, preparation for, and coping with death and dying.
Plants, Culture and Healing HHS 6992, G01, 17046 R 6:00-9:30pm Geisler This course focuses on the holistic healing relationship between humans and plants. We explore this relationship from a number of historical, philosophical, and cultural backgrounds by learning how plants and humans interact for mutual healing, ritual/ceremony, and meaning making. We encourage students to engage in their own ethical relationships with plants to develop a deep, holistic appreciation for the natural world and better understand myriad pathways of plant healing. We practice both the science and art of identifying, communicating with, gathering, preparing, storing, and using plants.
Community Health Worker Role, Advocacy, Outreach and Resources HLTH 1973, D01, 17824/W01, 17825 T 5:30-9pm Mumm

This course defines the role of the Community Health Worker (CHW).  Students will explain strategies for personal safety in relations to home visits.  Students will also gain an understanding of the value of self-care, and personal wellness.  Students will also become familiar with the health-related needs of their communities and cultural considerations.  Students will learn about their role as a liaison, connecting clients and appropriate community resources.

Health Communication and Cultural Competence, Teaching and Capacity Building HLTH 1983, D01, 17826/W01, 17827 T 5:30-9pm Khanal

This course will introduce concepts of verbal and non-verbal communication required for the CHW to effectively interact with clients, their families and healthcare providers of all backgrounds. Students apply skills such as active listening and motivational interviewing. This course also focuses on the CHW's role as a teacher to increase the capacity of the community and the client to access the health care and social services systems. Course materials will emphasize empowering clients to become self-sufficient in achieving personal health goals within the role of the CHW. Pre-requisite with concurrency:  HLTH 1973, D01/W01 - Community Health Worker Role, Advocacy, Outreach and Resources.

Documentation, Legal and Ethical Issues in Community Health Work HLTH 1993, D01, 19822/W01, 19823 T 5:30-9pm Khanal

This course also focuses on the importance and ability of the CHW to gather, document and report client visits and other activities. The emphasis is on appropriate, accurate and clear documentation considering legal and agency requirements for the CHW to effectively interact with clients, their families and healthcare providers of all backgrounds. Students apply skills such as active listening and motivational interviewing.   This course also focuses on the CHW's role as a teacher to increase the capability of the community and the client to access the health care and social services systems. Course materials will emphasis empowering clients to become self-sufficient in achieving personal health goals within the role of the CHW. Pre-requisite with concurrency: HLTH 1983, D01/W01 - Health Communication and Cultural Competence, Teaching and Capacity Building.

Understanding Structural Inequality INTP 6993, G01, 17768 Online Online Sever-Hall

Disability, as a conceptual and analytical framework, offers important interventions in our understanding of contemporary structural inequities in U.S. society. The course introduces you to the genre of historical writing, the usage of both primary and secondary sources in scholarship, and critical awareness of the roots of contemporary social inequities. Using a historical lens, this course encourages you to build connections between Disability Studies and Interpreting Studies as interdisciplinary fields. This course also scaffolds toward the framework attained through INTP 6250, Becoming Agents of Change, of emphasizing equity through intersectional, coalitional, and transformative approaches.

Themes in this course intertwine disability history with the histories of the carceral state, colonialism and imperialism, social reform movements, immigration, and language policy. This course draws from multiple types of media and sensory materials. Such materials include podcasts, movies, public historical scholarship, academic articles and monographs, and historical primary source materials like photographs, newspaper articles, film clips, and proceedings.

A nuanced, keen understanding of structural inequities offers you an expanded toolbox in which you can have critical, difficult conversations about equity, power, and privilege.

Senior Seminar and Portfolio Review LONG 4990, D01, 17867  Online Online Myers This course, taken concurrently with the capstone course in the student’s major, is a capstone experience for the Longevity and Aging (L&A) minor in which a student in their senior year finalizes their L&A Portfolio, guided by the minor program director. Over the course of the minor, the student will have collected curricular and co-curricular projects relating to Longevity and Aging, including artifacts from courses in a variety of disciplines. In this capstone course, the student will reflect on and critically analyze the experiences and artifacts in their portfolio and formally document their metacognitive learning regarding the many dimensions of longevity and aging.  Pre-requisites:  Instructor approval required.  Students must have completed or be concurrently registered for all other requirements of the minor AND must be concurrently registered for the capstone course in their major. 
Senior Seminar and Portfolio Review LONG 4991, D01, 17868 Online Online Myers This course is a capstone experience for the Longevity and Aging (L&A) minor in which a student in their senior year finalizes their L&A Portfolio, guided by the minor program director. Over the course of the minor, the student will have collected curricular and co-curricular projects relating to Longevity and Aging, including artifacts from courses in a variety of disciplines. In this capstone course, the student will reflect on and critically analyze the experiences and artifacts in their portfolio and formally document their metacognitive learning regarding the many dimensions of longevity and aging.  Pre-requisites:  Instructor approval required.  Students must have completed or be concurrently registered for all other requirements of the minor.
Global Sourcing MRCH 3994, D01, 17814 TR 1:30-3:10pm Parr Global sourcing is a course focused on supply chain management in today's agile industry. It will cover global factors, CSR and sustainability, sourcing, buying, assortment, category management, planning, data, logistics and financing and profit. Course will utilize case studies and simulations. Pre-requisites: Junior or senior status.
Asian Philosophy PHIL 2994, D01, 17431 MWF 1:00-2:05pm Johnson Who am I? What’s real? How should we treat one another? Is truth relative? How should we treat the natural world? What happens to us after death? How should we live together in society? Where does suffering come from? What’s enlightenment? In this course, we’ll explore these questions and more through the lens of Confucian, Daoist, Hindu, and Buddhist philosophical traditions. This course satisfies the Philosophy Core Requirement and counts toward the Philosophy Major and the Philosophy Minor.
Race, Racism, and Reparations PHIL 4994, D01, 17537 TR 1:30-3:10pm Hilden In this course, we will explore the origins of racial and caste categorization and the systems and practices of domination and subordination that were built around these categories.  We will apply philosophical methodologies to historical analyses, narratives, poetry, economics, political and social theory and will ultimately look at how to end these systems and practices through anti-racism movements, solidarity, and reparations. 
Psychology of Sexual Orientation with Lab PSYC 4994, D01, 17790/D50, 17791; WOST 4994, D01, 17810/D50, 17811 TR; R 1:30-3:10pm; 3:20-5:00pm Filip-Crawford Also offered as WOST. This course examines contemporary and historical perspectives and research related to the lives and experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals. Topics will include identity development, “coming out” processes, stereotypes and sexual prejudice, health disparities, and current LGBT-relevant public policy issues. Students will participate in laboratory exercises and design and execute a group research project. Pre-requisites: PSYC 1001, PSYC 1090, and PSYC 3000.
Wellness Practices in the Helping Professions SOWK 3994, D01, 17629 R 1:00-4:30pm Bidwell, Winkler This course will provide an opportunity for students in the helping professions to explore and engage in practices that foster sustainable personal and professional resilience, wellness and well-being. Together, we will discover ways to grow a “community of care” that supports ethical practice and compassionate leadership within a multidisciplinary context. The community of care approach embraces various ways of knowing and fosters diversity, equity, and inclusion by considering self, others, and community. Within this course we will engage in a variety of activities grounded in mindfulness and stress reduction as we develop self-care plans and community of care plans. S/U graded.

A History of Art ARTH 2994, D02, 26406/ARTH 2994, W01, 26938 R 6:00-9:30pm Hamlin This course offers a critical introduction to the past, present, and future of the discipline and methods of art history. Instead of exploring a traditional survey of the art of the so-called West, we will consider and critique that tradition by excavating the decommissioned university slide collection. These slides, which were used for several decades to teach art history at St. Kate’s, contain miniature reproductions of artworks that served to illuminate the master narrative of art history. In this process of excavation, we will reveal absent narratives and co-create counter-narratives for a future history of art. In learning the history of art history at St. Kate’s, students will also learn about the history of the stolen land that St. Kate’s occupies. As such, this course will engage Native feminist theories as well as Black feminist thought; key texts will condition a future history of art as speculative fiction. Students will leave this class with an enhanced capacity for critical and creative thinking, a deeper appreciation for the visual arts and their histories, as well as an ability to analyze the impact of systems of power and privilege that are perpetuated in academic disciplines and institutions. This course has no pre-requisites, and satisfies the Fine Arts Core requirement. Open to students in both the College for Adults and the College for Women.

Health Promotion Competencies 1

HLTH 1963, D01, 26876/W01, 26877 T 5:30-9:00pm Khanal

This course focuses on the role of the Community Health Worker in health promotion and disease prevention/management including cultural navigation, social determinants of health, connections to resources and supporting clients and families. Maternal child health, trauma informed care, mental health and healthy living topics are included.

Health Promotion Competencies 2 HLTH 1992, D01, 26878/W01, 26879 T 5:30-9:00pm Khanal

This course focuses on the role of the Community Health Worker in health promotion and disease prevention/management including cultural navigation, social determinants of health, connections to resources and supporting clients and families. The main chronic diseases that are preventable via healthy lifestyle (e.g. diabetes, heart disease and stroke, oral health, cancer) are covered in this course. Pre-requisite: HLTH 1963 - Health Promotion Competencies 1.

Honors Project Preparation HNRS 3990, D01, 27086 Online Online Cervantes

This class is for students who plan to write their senior honors project next year.  We will spend the class developing a project idea, identifying committee members and preparing for the early stages of the project.  We will meet several times over the course of the semester and determine a schedule based on the schedules of course participants.  Must have Junior standing or higher, otherwise instructor approval required.

Building a Sustainable World INDI 2992, D01, 26936 TR 1:30-3:10pm Pasricha Everyone thinks that they know what sustainability is, but few people truly understand it-and fewer still can explain or apply it to their life and profession. Sustainability is the paradigm of the 21st century that seeks a balance of ecologically sound, economically viable, socially just and humane values. Building a Sustainable World is the introductory course for the new Interdisciplinary Sustainability Studies Minor. This course gives you a comprehensive overview of the interconnected earth systems and fields of study, promoting critical thinking of sustainability issues. We will use Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and feel empowered to find solutions by creating a roadmap to improve our world. This interactive class will have guest speakers, field visits, discussions, and reflection.
Simulated Patient Training IPE 2992, D01, 26926 T 5:30-7:10pm Broughten

In this course, students will go through in-depth simulated patient training. In doing so, students will gain familiarity with various health professions, develop skills to provide effective feedback to other learners, and gain an understanding of social determinants of health. Course topics will include acting skills, information about medical conditions, effective communication, and cultural fluency. By the end of the course, students will be prepared to serve as simulated patients for educational programs as well as health care entities. All students who enroll and pass the class will be able to pursue a minimum of eight hours of paid simulated patient work for the Henrietta Schmoll of School of Health in summer and fall 2022.

Senior Seminar and Portfolio Prep LONG 4990, D01, 27087 Online Online Myers This course, taken concurrently with the capstone course in the student’s major, is a capstone experience for the Longevity and Aging (L&A) minor in which a student in their senior year finalizes their L&A Portfolio, guided by the minor program director. Over the course of the minor, the student will have collected curricular and co-curricular projects relating to Longevity and Aging, including artifacts from courses in a variety of disciplines. In this capstone course, the student will reflect on and critically analyze the experiences and artifacts in their portfolio and formally document their metacognitive learning regarding the many dimensions of longevity and aging.  Pre-requisites:  Instructor approval required.  Students must have completed or be concurrently registered for all other requirements of the minor AND must be concurrently registered for the capstone course in their major. 
Senior Seminar and Portfolio Prep LONG 4991, D01, 27088 Online Online Myers This course is a capstone experience for the Longevity and Aging (L&A) minor in which a student in their senior year finalizes their L&A Portfolio, guided by the minor program director. Over the course of the minor, the student will have collected curricular and co-curricular projects relating to Longevity and Aging, including artifacts from courses in a variety of disciplines. In this capstone course, the student will reflect on and critically analyze the experiences and artifacts in their portfolio and formally document their metacognitive learning regarding the many dimensions of longevity and aging.  Pre-requisites:  Instructor approval required.  Students must have completed or be concurrently registered for all other requirements of the minor.
Difference, Conflict and Inclusion ORLD 6983, G01, 26933 TS 6:00-9:00pm; 9:00am-4:00pm Radd This course gives students the theoretical and practical knowledge they need to lead more proactively, effectively, and inclusively across differences. Students will examine how their own experiences shape their ability to effectively lead across multiple dimensions of difference, including racial, cultural, and personal differences, and discuss strategies to develop diversity, inclusion, and conflict leadership competency. Students will also learn how organizations can identify and address disparities that exist both internally and within their local communities. Finally, students will consider difference and conflict at the organizational and community levels, exploring the business case for conflict competence as well as diversity and inclusion initiatives. 
Leading Global Teams that Work ORLD 6993, G01, 26928 RFS 6:00-9:00pm; 8:30am-4:00pm Thomas

Today everyone is working across time, space, cultures and organizations. Yet most diverse, remote teams don't achieve their goals--and most global leaders don't know why their teams fail, much less how to create peak performing, cross-border, remote teams.

In this seminar we will explore how culturally competent global team leadership is key to remote team and global organizational success. You will acquire the frameworks, tools and best practices of successful global leaders and teams so you can ignite your own remote teams and get top results every time.

Forensic Psychology with Lab PSYC 4994, D01, 26931/W01, 27041 T 6:30-9:30pm Ertelt, Sesma

This course surveys the applications of psychological science to the legal system, including the civil justice system, criminal justice system, criminal investigations, judicial and jury decision making, and the relationship between psychopathology and criminal behavior. Students will participate in weekly discussions and lectures while designing and implementing their own studies to contribute to the research literature in forensic psychology. Pre-requisites: PSYC 1001, PSYC 1090, PSYC 3000.

Spiritualities for Discipleship THEO 6994, G01, 26752 T 6:00-9:15pm Bischoff, Manns

“Spirituality” is a notoriously tricky word to define, made none the easier to understand when it is paired with the qualifier “Christian.” In this course, we undertake the intrepid work of striving to understand Christian spiritualties as they are expressed through spiritual practice. We consider how expressions of Christian spiritualties have shifted over time and across space and observe the complementarity and disconnects between historical and contemporary expressions of Christian spirituality.


This course is grounded in spiritual practices. Practices are complex, meaning-filled activities
into which one is mentored and whose meaning becomes clearer to the person being mentor the more she engages in them. Spiritual practices invite us into deeper relationship with God,
ourselves, others, and the world around us; as such, practices feed both our contemplation and action. As we discover these practices together, we will learn how these practices arose out of particular times and places, as well as how these practices have changed over time to meet the shifting needs of communities. Our hope is to support you in developing spiritual practices for resilience that will sustain you as disciples in our contemporary, multi-religious and secular world.


This course is highly experiential and reflective through presentations, assigned readings, small and large group dialogue, and personal reflection activities and papers.  Fulfills the MAT degree requirement for a course in the History of Christian Spirituality.

 

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COURSE TITLE COURSE INFORMATION DAY TIME INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION