Nursing (MSN/DNP): Nurse Practitioner

Nursing: Nurse Practitioner

Graduate College | Henrietta Schmoll School of Health

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP): Nurse Practitioner option from St. Catherine University challenges nurses to integrate their professional experience with new knowledge and skills in order to assume an advanced practice role in nursing. Driven by a mission rooted in social justice, our nurse practitioner doctorate students develop their nurse practitioner expertise and leadership skills to improve health outcomes for all populations, especially the most vulnerable.

Program Details

Format: Weekdays, with some online and weekend classes

Completion time: 3 years

Credits: 74

Cost per credit (2019–2020): $1,074

Start: Summer

Explore the courses

Sample plan of study

Scholarships

Nurse Practitioner students employed by St. Kate’s corporate partners receive a partner scholarship, reducing tuition costs by 10%. Students are also eligible to apply for loan and grant programs.

Advance Your Role in Healthcare

The DNP: Nurse Practitioner option prepares nurses for advanced practice roles in primary care. The graduate curriculum builds on the expertise, experience, and skills of the professional nurse. Core content includes critical decision-making, ethical leadership, cultural diversity, nursing theory, nursing research, evidence-based practice, administrative problem-solving, and health policy.

As part of your course of study, you will complete classes and clinical experiences to earn a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) in 18 months, which allows you to sit for the national certification exam in your selected specialty area.

Plans of study are also available for current nurse practitioners with a master's degree in nursing who seek a second area of specialization along with the DNP degree.

College for Adults students on Fontbonne steps
Careers as a Certified Nurse Practitioner

A pediatric nurse practitioner (PNP) provides primary care — including physical exams, diagnosis, and treatment of common pediatric illnesses — developmental evaluations, and nutritional guidance to children of all ages. PNPs work in collaboration with other healthcare professionals in various settings, emphasizing health promotion, illness prevention, and supporting parents to develop effective parenting skills.

An adult-gerontological nurse practitioner (AGNP) assumes an advanced practice role in the provision of primary healthcare to adults of all ages. Health promotion, health education, and the early detection of risk factors are important components of the AGNP’s role. They engage in independent decision making about healthcare needs, promoting the health or managing illness states of individuals and their families or significant others. AGNPs work in collaboration with other healthcare professionals, ensure continuity of services across the continuum of settings (home, long-term care, transitional care, acute care, clinic, and residential), and act as an advocate for the client in the healthcare system.

Program Accreditation

The DNP program is accredited by the Accreditation Commission on Education in Nursing (ACEN) and approved by the Minnesota Board of Nursing.

Please review full accreditation and outcome data information

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