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International Relations Course Descriptions

The international relations major consists of courses from the economics, history and political science departments.

ECON 2610: PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (4 credits)

The course gives an introduction to microeconomics: theory of the firm and the household, price determination, theory of production, income distribution, application of economic theory to current economic problems. Also offered in Weekend College. Prerequisites: High school algebra.

ECON 2620: PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (4 credits)

The course gives an introduction to macroeconomics: national income analysis, the problem of full employment and price stability, monetary and fiscal policies, international trade and finance, application of economic theory to current economic problems. Also offered in Weekend College. Prerequisites: High school algebra. Recommended: ECON 2610.

ECON 3450: ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT AND GROWTH (4 credits)

This course covers the nature and measurements of economic development and growth; economic, social and political factors in the development process; theories of economic growth; the role of government and economic planning in the developed and less-developed countries; internal and external sources for financing economic development; environment, resources and limits to growth. Prerequisites: ECON 2610 or 2620.

ECON 3480: INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (4 credits)

This course covers theory of international trade: why nations trade, gains from trade, comparative advantage, transfer costs, international factor movements, intra-industry trade, world trade and the American economy. Also examines practice of international trade, international trade relations, tariff and non-tariff trade barriers, U.S. trade policy, international trade problems of developing nations and international payment mechanisms. Also offered in Weekend College every other year. Prerequisites: ECON 2610, 2620.

HIST 1060: EUROPE SINCE 1800 (4 credits)

This course covers the 19th century; Concert of Europe; balance of power; Italian and German unification; the alliance system; World War I and disintegration of Europe; Fascist Italy, Nazi Germany, Soviet Russia; World War II; Cold War (the former U.S.S.R. vs. U.S.A.); nuclear confrontation; Vietnam War; Middle East crises (Arabs vs. Israel, Gulf War); disintegration of the Soviet Bloc; 1992 and reintegration of Europe. Offered annually.

HIST 1160: EAST ASIA SINCE 1600 (4 credits)

This course serves as a general survey of the history of East Asia from 1600 to the present with an emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. The majority of the course material focuses on China and Japan. Korea and Vietnam are also included but receive less coverage. The course focuses on the political, social, and economic systems of these countries, major historical events, intra-Asian interactions and East Asia’s response to the West.

HIST 3550: TWENTIETH CENTURY CHINA (4 credits)

This course covers the major events and themes in 20th-century Chinese history. Emphasis is on the Communist phase of the Chinese Revolution. Major topics include the social and political systems of early 20th century China; the founding and growth of the Chinese Communist Party; Civil War and Communist victory; the regime of Mao Zedong; and Deng Xiaoping's Second Revolution.

HIST 3600: GERMANY: FROM UNIFICATION TO REUNIFICATION (4 credits)

This course covers the Second Reich from victory to defeat (1871-1918); Weimar Republic, a stillborn democracy; Third Reich and Nazi dictatorship; World War II and Gotterdammerung; two Germanies amid a Cold War; the unforeseen revolution and reunification.

HIST 3620: EUROPE SINCE WORLD WAR II (4 credits)

This course covers the Cold War; economic miracles, decolonization, and the movement toward European unity; science and technology; new social patterns; the economy and oil as king, the revolutions of 1989; and future prospects.

HIST 3700: HISTORY OF FEMINISM IN WESTERN SOCIETY (4 credits)

This course traces the development of feminist thought and activism in Western society from the ancient Greeks to the late 20th century in the United States. The course explores the social, political, legal and cultural status of women in Western society across time. Special emphasis is placed on the roots of modern feminism as it developed in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries in Western Europe and in the United States. Also offered as WOST.

POSC 3030: POLITICS IN EUROPE (4 credits)

This is a comparative study of the structure and process of European political systems and current issues of public policy. The course concentrates on the industrial democracies of the European Union, but also offers a glimpse into the politics of East European countries.

POSC 3200: AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY (4 credits)

This is an examination of the basic concepts used in analysis of foreign policy and of the main issues and problems of U.S. foreign policy as it has unfolded since World War II. Issues include origins of the Cold War, containment in Europe and Asia, nuclear weapons and the arms race, Cuban Missile Crisis, U.S. policy in the developing world, Vietnam, detente and its death, U.S. interests in the Middle East, the post-Cold War world order.

POSC 3300: HAVES AND HAVE-NOTS (4 credits)

In this course, you will study the causes of international inequality in the distribution of wealth to examine why some countries are rich and others are poor. Discussions critically examine contending theories of development and underdevelopment (modernization theory, dependency and world systems theories, cultural explanations and state-centric theories). Also offered as CRST.

POSC 3350: NATIONALISM AND ETHNIC CONFLICT (4 credits)

In this course you will study theories of nationalism and the aspirations of nationalist actors in both domestic and international contexts. Particular attention is given to problems of citizenship and state formation; ethnicity and nationalism; democratic institutional design and political representation; and ethnic conflict. Case studies are drawn from the industrial democracies and the developing world.

POSC 3400: INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (4 credits)

In this course you will study the structure and uses of power and the interrelationship between economics and politics. You examine international economic relations in terms of their impacts on international political conflict, world order and the connection to domestic political concerns. The course focuses on trade and monetary and investment relations among industrialized states and between industrialized and developing countries. Liberal, Neo-Marxian and Mercantilist frameworks for analyzing these questions are employed throughout the course. Prerequisites: Recommended: ECON 2610 and 2620.

POSC 4994: TOPICS (4 credits)

The subject matter of the course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. Content varies from year to year.