International Business and Economics Courses

The international business and economics major blends courses from the Business Administration Department and the Economics Department.

ACCT 2110: FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (4 credits)

This course is an introduction to accounting, which will enable you to achieve a basic working knowledge of accounting and its uses. Emphasis is placed on the need to read and interpret financial statements. Accounting theory and uses of accounting information are integrated with the conceptual framework and social role of accounting. Problem solving, ethical issues and computer skills are an integral part of the course. A major goal of the course is to develop your critical-thinking skills. Also offered in Weekend College.

ACCT 2130: MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (4 credits)

This course emphasizes the use of accounting information to help make managerial decisions. It also covers the basics of cost accounting techniques, budgeting and the use of accounting information for management planning and control. This course helps you develop your critical-thinking and computer-spreadsheet skills. Also offered in Weekend College. Prerequisites: ACCT 2110 with a grade of C- or better.

ACCT 3210:  FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (4 credits)

This course deals with financial decisions that corporate management must make to maximize stockholder wealth. Key topics you will study include capital budgeting, valuation of financial assets, determination of a firm's cost of capital, interpretation and analysis of financial information, working capital management and impact of financial decisions on a firm's expected return and risk. The course emphasizes the use of library and computer resources to research companies and finance topics. Also offered in Weekend College. Prerequisites: ACCT 2130; MATH 1070 or MATH 1130.

MKTG 2300: INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING (2 credits)

This introductory course examines the role of marketing in organizations. You will explore the process of identifying customer needs, segmenting and targeting markets and developing a marketing mix (product, place, promotion, pricing). Also offered in Weekend College.

MGMT 2400: PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (4 credits)

This course provides you with an understanding of effective management practices and structures. It emphasizes leadership requirements for managers, as well as three additional primary functions of management: planning, organizing and controlling. You will explore the ethical foundation for all business practices. Also offered in Weekend College.

MKTG 3500: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT (4 credits)

This course is an introduction to international marketing and management aimed at familiarizing you with the range of marketing, management, political, social, ethical and cultural factors encountered in the international arena. Among the topics to be examined are globalization, international trade organizations, modes of entry, country risk analysis, product adaptations and approaches to intercultural negotiating. You will also examine cultural norms and values in key world regions and use this knowledge to find successful solutions to real life management and marketing situations through case studies. In addition to case studies, group exercises, lectures and role plays are used to assist you in acquiring an understanding of how to succeed in international contexts. Prerequisites: MGMT 2400. Highly recommended: MKTG 2300.

ECON 2250: STATISTICAL ANALYSIS FOR DECISION MAKING (4 credits)

The course gives an introduction to quantitative decision making, descriptive statistics, data analysis, probability, sampling, estimation, regression, index numbers and forecasting. This course fulfills the liberal arts core mathematics/statistics requirement. Also offered in Weekend College. Prerequisites: Appropriate level on mathematics/statistics placement assessment or ACT math score. Credit is given for only one of the following courses: ECON 2200, ECON 2250, MATH 1080 or PSYC 2050..

ECON 2610: PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (4 credits)

The course gives an introduction to microeconomics: theory of the firm and the household, price determination, theory of production, income distribution, application of economic theory to current economic problems. Also offered in Weekend College. Prerequisites: High school algebra.

ECON 2620: PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (4 credits)

The course gives an introduction to macroeconomics: national income analysis, the problem of full employment and price stability, monetary and fiscal policies, international trade and finance, application of economic theory to current economic problems. Also offered in Weekend College. Prerequisites: High school algebra. Recommended: ECON 2610.

ECON 3450: ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT AND GROWTH (4 credits)

This course covers the nature and measurements of economic development and growth; economic, social and political factors in the development process; theories of economic growth; the role of government and economic planning in the developed and less-developed countries; internal and external sources for financing economic development; environment, resources and limits to growth. Prerequisites: ECON 2610 or 2620.

ECON 3460: GLOBAL FINANCIAL ISSUES (4 credits)

This course covers institutional and theoretical issues in international finance; foreign exchange markets, currency futures and options markets, balance of payments and international economic linkages. It also examines foreign exchange risk management, multinational finances and foreign investment analyses. Prerequisites: ECON 2250, 2610, 2620.

ECON 3480: INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (4 credits)

This course covers theory of international trade: why nations trade, gains from trade, comparative advantage, transfer costs, international factor movements, intra-industry trade, world trade and the American economy. Also examines practice of international trade, international trade relations, tariff and non-tariff trade barriers, U.S. trade policy, international trade problems of developing nations and international payment mechanisms. Also offered in Weekend College every other year. Prerequisites: ECON 2610, 2620.

ECON 4850: SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (4 credits)

The seminar involves directed readings and discussions on business and economic aspects of the international system and the completion of a senior research paper on a specific topic to be chosen in consultation with the instructor. The seminar is led by the coordinator of the international business and economics major and includes participation by guest lecturers in business and economics. Prerequisites: ECON 3450, 3460, 3480.

HIST 1160: EAST ASIA SINCE 1600 (4 credits)

This course serves as a general survey of the history of East Asia from 1600 to the present with an emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. The majority of the course material focuses on China and Japan. Korea and Vietnam are also included but receive less coverage. The course focuses on the political, social, and economic systems of these countries, major historical events, intra-Asian interactions and East Asia's response to the West.

POSC 2200: INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT (4 credits)

This course offers an examination of basic concepts of comparative politics such as political power, types of political systems and political development. It involves analysis of similarities and differences in the components of political systems: political culture, participation, leadership, interest groups, political parties, legislatures, executives, judiciaries and bureaucracy. Case studies of several major political systems, which may include Great Britain, France, Russia, Japan, China, India and Kenya, will be included.