HomePhysics

Studying physics is a great way to add to your liberal arts education at St. Kate's. You can learn about a broad array of topics from astronomy to electricity and magnetism.

St. Kate's students may obtain a Physics minor, or they may pursue a major through an agreement with the Associated Colleges of the Twin Cities.

Physics Course Offerings

PHYS 1000: GREAT IDEAS IN SCIENCE (4 credits)

This course is intended for non-science majors. It develops the processes of science through the study of some of the most interesting topics in science that have had an impact on our understanding of the world in which we live. Topics include relativity, radioactivity, lasers, cosmology, the nature of the atom and nucleus and nuclear power. The course stresses understanding of basic concepts rather than difficult mathematical models. Four hours of lecture and one two-hour lab session per week. Also offered in Weekend College.

PHYS 1020: PHYSICS CONCEPTS (4 credits)

Physics 1020 is an introductory course that requires no prior knowledge of physics. This course is an introduction to basic concepts of physics including basic properties of fluids, motion, energy, force, electromagnetic spectrum, electricity, and the atom. You learn basic principles and apply them in problem situations.

PHYS 1040: ASTRONOMY (4 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the physical principles and processes of science applicable to the study of astronomy. This study is largely observationally based utilizing the University's astrophysical observatory with a computerized telescope and research instrumentation. Topics include a study of the solar system, the earth and moon system, stellar structure and evolution, giants, dwarfs, pulsars and black holes, nebulae, galaxies, quasars, cosmology and the search for extraterrestrial life. Four lectures and two laboratory hours per week. Also offered in Weekend College.

PHYS 1080: PHYSICS FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES I (4 credits)

This course and its continuation, PHYS 1090, is designed especially for physical therapy and related studies requiring only algebra-based physics. The first semester focuses on applications of mechanics and thermodynamics to the human body and physical agent modalities. Four hours of lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: High school algebra.

PHYS 1090: PHYSICS FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES II (4 credits)

This is a continuation of PHYS 1080. This course focuses on electric and magnetic fields, circuits, wave theory, optics and modern physics including medical imaging. Prerequisites: PHYS 1080.

PHYS 1110: INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I (4 credits)

This course and its continuation, PHYS 1120, are intended for pre-medicine, physical and life science, mathematics and pre-engineering students. The principles of classical mechanics, vectors, kinematics, particle and rigid body rotational dynamics and statics; conservation laws; fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Four hours of lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites with concurrency: MATH 1120 or 1130.

PHYS 1120: INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS II (4 credits)

This is a continuation of PHYS 1110. The principles of thermal, wave, optical and electromagnetic phenomena with an introduction to modern physics are studied. Four hours of lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: PHYS 1110. Prerequisites with concurrency: MATH 1140.

PHYS 1200: MAKIN' AND BREAKIN': ENGINEERING IN YOUR WORLD (4 credits)

Most of the world we experience everyday is human made or engineered. Engineers create products from indoor plumbing to airplanes that make our lives more comfortable and convenient. This course is an introduction to the engineering concepts associated with products in your everyday life, including structures, machines & mechanisms, hydraulics & pneumatics, and electricity. Classes are a mixture of mini-lectures about concepts and associated calculations, experiments to solidify concepts, discussions to generalize concepts to other technologies, and projects to apply the concepts to new problems. This course meets the liberal arts core requirement for lab science.

PHYS 1210: PHYSICS OF THE NEW TECHNOLOGIES (4 credits)

Many of the new technologies in today's world have been developed using basic physics principles and new applications of these concepts. This course focuses on the science behind the new technologies and helps you understand how they work. Moreover, it gives the non-science major a background in fundamental physics to intelligently examine new discoveries and the individual merit of each. Application topics covered include robotics, fiber optics, lasers, digital video and both digital and analog electronics. The ability to use basic algebra is required. Prerequisites: MATH 1070.

PHYS 2600: PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION (4 credits)

This course is intended to provide scientists (both physical and life) and engineers with a background in electronics and instrumentation so that they can select the instrumentation most appropriate to a measurement or control problem. Course covers analysis of basic electronic circuits used in scientific electronic instrumentation. There is an emphasis on a practical approach to circuits using discrete and integrated circuit devices; d.c. and a.c. circuit analysis; filters and feedback; amplifiers; power supplies; oscillators; counting, switching, timing, wave shaping and digital circuits. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: PHYS 1120 or permission of the instructor.

PHYS 2750: PRINCIPLES OF MICROPROCESSOR TECHNOLOGY (4 credits)

This course provides the background in digital electronics and logic circuits for majors in science and computer studies. Topics to be investigated include analog/digital conversion; assembly and machine languages; interfacing; microprocessor design and measurement; and signal processing for biological, chemical and physical laboratory experiments. Prerequisites: PHYS 1120, MATH 1140.

PHYS 4684: DIRECTED STUDY (4 credits)

Directed study is provided for students whose unusual circumstances prohibit taking a regularly scheduled course but who need the material of that course to satisfy a requirement. Availability of this faculty-directed learning experience depends on faculty time and may be limited in any given term and restricted to certain courses. Prerequisites: Faculty, department chair and dean approval.

PHYS 4994: TOPICS (4 credits)

The subject matter of the course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. Content varies from year to year but does not duplicate existing courses.

Faculty

Name Phone E-mail
All phone numbers begin with (651) 690- unless noted.
Jolene Johnson
Professor
6135 jljohnsonarmstrong@stkate.edu
Erick Agrimson
Assistant Professor
8834 epagrimson@stkate.edu
Kaye Smith
Assistant Professor
6214 klsmith2@stkate.edu